News & Events

  • Thu, 01/23/2020

    WMUR: Dog in NH diagnosed with fungal disease common in Southwest

    "It's really important to talk to your vet about the history of if your pet traveled to the area, even just for vacation, or if you adopted it from that area," Monahan said.
  • Photomicrograph from the biopsied mass showing a fungal spherule (arrow), consistent with Coccidioides, surrounded by inflammatory cells. Credit: NH Veterinary Diagnostic Lab
    Tue, 01/21/2020

    UNH Pathologist Diagnoses Valley Fever in Rescue Dog from Arizona

    A pathologist with New Hampshire Diagnostic Veterinary Lab at the University of New Hampshire recently diagnosed the fungal disease Valley Fever in a rescue dog from Arizona. It is the first time the lab has diagnosed this disease in a dog in the state. The disease, which is treatable, is endemic in the Southwest and rarely seen in native New England dogs.
  • Tue, 01/21/2020

    Concord Monitor: When pets travel, pet diseases also travel

    A pathologist with the New Hampshire Diagnostic Veterinary Lab at the University of New Hampshire recently diagnosed the fungal disease Valley Fever in a rescue dog from Arizona. It is the first time the lab has diagnosed this disease in a dog in the state. The disease, which is treatable, is endemic in the Southwest and rarely seen in native New England dogs.
  • Fri, 01/17/2020

    Fruit Growers News: NH Agricultural Experiment Station shares updates at 2020 NH Farm and Forest Expo

    Are rivers the livers of watersheds? Should farmers plant cider apples to thwart pests in orchards? Come find out from scientists with the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire, who will present their latest research at the 2020 New Hampshire Farm, Forest, and Garden Expo.
  • Tue, 01/14/2020

    NHPR: New England Will See More ‘Winter Heat Waves’ As Climate Warms, Scientists Say

    Scientists say winter warm spells – like the one the Northeast saw this past weekend – are in line with predictions for climate change.
  • Oyster River
    Mon, 01/13/2020

    Are Rivers the Livers of Watersheds? Should Farmers Plant Cider Apples to Thwart Pests?

    Are rivers the livers of watersheds? Should farmers plant cider apples to thwart pests in orchards? Come find out from scientists with the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire, who will present their latest research at the 2020 New Hampshire Farm, Forest, and Garden Expo.
  • Fri, 01/10/2020

    Seacoast Online: UNH research: Cows fed kelp meal are less gassy, and that’s good for the planet

    Experiment station researchers will collaborate with New England scientists on a new $3 million grant from the Shelby Cullom Davis Charitable Fund to investigate reducing methane emissions of lactating dairy cows by supplementing their diet with kelp meal (brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum) and other seaweeds. 
  • Thu, 01/09/2020

    Fosters: UNH research: Cows fed kelp meal are less gassy, and that’s good for the planet

    Organic dairy cows fed kelp meal produced less methane for part of the summer grazing season, according to researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire. Based on these initial and other promising results, scientists will expand their studies to look at how kelp and other seaweeds impact animal health and methane emissions of organic dairy cows in New England.
  • Wed, 01/08/2020

    Morning Ag Clips: Seaweed research to benefit region’s dairy farmers

     Organic dairy cows fed kelp meal produced less methane for part of the summer grazing season, according to researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire. Based on these initial and other promising results, scientists will expand their studies to look at how kelp and other seaweeds impact animal health and methane emissions of organic dairy cows in New England.
  • Wed, 01/08/2020

    Union Leader Editorial: Cows for kelp? UNH Ag folks to test seaweed diet

    UNH has a long, productive history with agriculture and continues to work with farmers and gardeners, among others, in its agriculture extension programs. The seaweed project sounds promising. If it pays off, farmers may not feel so much pressure to make hay while the sun shines.
  • Tue, 01/07/2020

    Union Leader: Seaweed diet may make cows less greenhouse gassy

    “Incorporating changes in feed composition has downstream consequences for pasture performance,” Brito said in the news release. “This includes not only grass nutritional quality and growth rates but also the rates of loss of carbon and nitrogen resources to the atmosphere in the form of greenhouse gases.”
  • Mon, 01/06/2020

    UNH Scientists Expand Seaweed Research to Benefit Region’s Dairy Farmers

    Organic dairy cows fed kelp meal produced less methane for part of the summer grazing season, according to researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire. Based on these initial and other promising results, scientists will expand their studies to look at how kelp and other seaweeds impact animal health and methane emissions of organic dairy cows in New England.
  • Mon, 01/06/2020

    Concord Monitor: To reduce cow burps’ nastiness, just add seaweed

     Organic dairy cows fed kelp meal produced less methane for part of the summer grazing season, according to researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire. Based on these initial and other promising results, scientists will expand their studies to look at how kelp and other seaweeds impact animal health and methane emissions of organic dairy cows in New England.
  • Mon, 12/30/2019

    Washington Post: Slippery salvation: Could seaweed as cow feed help climate?

    The researchers — from a marine science lab, an agriculture center and universities in northern New England — are working on a plan to feed seaweed to cows to gauge whether that can help reduce the greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change.
  • Mon, 12/30/2019

    NH Agricultural Experiment Station 2019 Research in Review

    Our researchers and graduate students are working on more than 50 research projects to serve the Granite State. Here are a few highlights from 2019. 
  • Mon, 12/23/2019

    Happy Holidays

    In December 2018, Ruby got her hoof caught in a grate, pulled it off, and slipped into a manure trench at our Fairchild Dairy Teaching and Research Center. Durham Fire and McGregor EMS crews worked for three hours to rescue the 1,200 Holstein, who was not pregnant at the time, from her “stinky situation.” The grate since has been modified. This December, first responders reunited with Ruby and met her one-week-old calf, named McGregor by University of New Hampshire College of Life Sciences and Agriculture students to recognize their effort in saving Ruby’s life. We hope your holiday season is just as memorable as Ruby’s was last year, but for less dramatic (and smelly) reasons.
  • Fri, 12/20/2019

    Concord Monitor: Is genetic history lurking in old apple trees hiding on your property?

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture has an entire program based in New York to research and teach “plant and animal genetic resources preservation,” and you’ve probably heard of Svalbard Global Seed Vault on the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen, which collects material from seed banks around the world to preserve it in case of major calamity.  All this is being done partly for aesthetic and environmental reasons – diversity is good – but mostly for practical reasons, said Richard Smith, whose job title at UNH is awesome: associate professor of cropping systems ecology and management. 
  • Mon, 12/16/2019

    A Connection to the Land

    I grew up on a farm that was in my family for six or seven generations. My mom still runs it with my sister. Both my parents farmed; I’ve been exposed to plants and animals since I was tiny. Several pictures of me as a little kid show me hugging mums.
  • Thu, 12/12/2019

    Union Leader: UNH scientist one of 'the world's most influential researchers'

    “Don’t give up. Be persistent, work hard and follow your passion. Don’t let anyone tell you you can’t do it. Seek out scientists and see if you can work with them. I’ve had elementary, middle and high school students contact me about doing research projects. It’s never too early to start,” Frey said.
  • Wed, 12/11/2019

    Fosters: UNH ecologist a top 0.1 percent scientist: Here’s why

    Serita Frey, professor of soil microbial ecology at the University of New Hampshire and a researcher with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, has been named one of the most highly cited researchers in the world, a prestigious distinction earned by fewer than 0.1 percent of scientists globally.
  • Wed, 12/11/2019

    Union Leader: Reunion for UNH's Ruby the cow and the firefighters who saved her

    Emergency rescue workers who helped to save the life of a cow that got stuck in a manure trench at the University of New Hampshire last year had a reunion with her and her newborn calf on Wednesday morning.
  • Tue, 12/10/2019

    Concord Monitor: Science Cafe panelist (oh, yes, also a UNH scientist) wins big recognition

    Serita Frey, professor of soil microbial ecology at the University of New Hampshire and a researcher with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, has been named one of the most highly cited researchers in the world, a distinction earned by fewer than 0.1 percent of scientists globally. If that name sounds familiar, Concord, it’s because she was one of the panelists at our Science Cafe New Hampshire last June, which talked about the weird, hidden world of microbes and trees.
  • Mon, 12/09/2019

    UNH Ecologist Named One of Most Highly Cited Researchers in World

    Serita Frey, professor of soil microbial ecology at the University of New Hampshire and a researcher with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, has been named one of the most highly cited researchers in the world, a prestigious distinction earned by fewer than 0.1 percent of scientists globally.
  • Tue, 12/03/2019

    Wired: Melting ski resorts are developing a fatal addiction to snow machines

    With thousands of snowmaking devices dotted around the world’s ski resorts gobbling energy, some have questioned how much they are themselves contributing to the very climatic changes that have altered natural snowfall. NH Agricultural Experiment Station researcher Elizabeth Burakowski says snowmaking operations that don’t rely on renewable energy risk becoming part of the problem.
  • Wed, 11/27/2019

    Union Leader: UNH dairy researchers studying calves and heifers to improve farming in state

    Research being conducted on calves and heifers at the University of New Hampshire is geared at helping dairy farmers in the state.