News & Events

  • Tue, 10/22/2019

    Union Leader: UNH research finds growers can substantially boost strawberry season

    New research out of the NH Agricultural Experiment Station provides a road map for growers seeking to increase production during what is normally considered the off-season for locally grown strawberries.
  • Tue, 10/22/2019

    Morning Ag Clips: N.H. growers can expand strawberry season

    “Our study shows that local strawberries can be grown from early summer through late fall in our area. This is yet another illustration of the diversity of crops that can be grown in this part of the country during months that were previously considered the off-season,” said Kaitlyn Orde, research associate who worked with experiment station researcher Becky Sideman, professor of sustainable agriculture and food systems and UNH Cooperative Extension professor and specialist in sustainable horticulture production.
  • New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station researchers at the University of New Hampshire have more than doubled the annual yield of strawberries and quadrupled the length of the N.H. harvest season by growing specific varieties of fruit in specific conditions.
    Mon, 10/21/2019

    UNH Research Finds N.H. Growers Can Substantially Boost Strawberry Season

    New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station researchers at the University of New Hampshire have more than doubled the annual yield of strawberries and quadrupled the length of the N.H. harvest season by growing specific varieties of fruit in specific conditions. The new research provides a road map for growers seeking to increase local production during what is normally considered the off season for locally grown strawberries.
  • Mon, 10/21/2019

    NHPR: Opossum, Porcupine, and Fisher: Some Underappreciated N.H. Creatures

    We focus on some of New Hampshire's under-appreciated animals: opossum, porcupine, and fisher. They don't grab headlines like the state's larger wildlife, like moose or bear. In fact, they are often viewed as nuisances. But these mammals play an important role in our ecosystem and have had their own recent struggles, including a fatal fungus affecting porcupines and a decline in fisher populations.
  • Mon, 10/14/2019

    Connecting the Dots for Pollinator Conservation

    The NH Agricultural Experiment Station recently hosted “Connecting the Dots for Pollinator Conservation:  Wildflower Meadows and Pollinator Habitat.” Pollinators are essential for most of the fruit and vegetable crops produced in New England. The value of pollination to agriculture is estimated at more than $200 billion a year worldwide. However, the abundance of and diversity of pollinators are declining in landscapes across the United States.
  • Mon, 10/07/2019

    Join Us for UNH Food and Agriculture Day Nov. 7

    Farmers and those involved with New Hampshire’s food and agricultural industry are invited to meet with researchers and industry experts and explore how they can partner and collaborate with the University of New Hampshire.
  • Tue, 10/01/2019

    Animals.com: Bobcats Are Back From the Brink (and Possibly in Your Backyard)

    "Bobcat populations are increasing now, throughout much of their geographic range," says Litvaitis. "I am amazed at the abilities they have to adapt to a demanding and changing environment because, unlike coyotes and foxes, bobcats are strict carnivores, so their diet places substantial challenges to acclimating to suburban and urban life."
  • Tue, 10/01/2019

    Morning Ag Clips: UNH recognized for water quality technology

    “To address the challenges of today and the future, we need innovative thinkers at the global- and local-level,” said Principal Deputy Assistant Administrator for Science and EPA Science Advisor Jennifer Orme-Zavaleta. “We commend the ‘challenge’ winners for identifying creative ways to use low-cost tools to understand our resources and better inform nutrient management decisions.”
  • Mon, 09/30/2019

    EPA Recognizes UNH Researchers for Innovative Technology Used to Monitor Water Quality

    Researchers with the University of New Hampshire have been recognized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for their innovative efforts in using low-cost technology to monitor water quality in manmade reservoirs.
  • Mon, 09/23/2019

    Debilitating, Often Fatal Fungal Disease Discovered in Region’s Wild Porcupines

    A debilitating, often fatal fungal disease has been discovered in wild North American porcupines in Maine, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire, according to the New Hampshire Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Mon, 09/16/2019

    Morning Ag Clips: Disease-resistant weed shows promise for quinoa

    Researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have discovered a native relative of quinoa with high disease resistance that may be an ideal breeding partner to re-domesticate the superfood in Northern New England. A locally adapted source of quinoa would give the region’s farmers new high-value grain crop that is in high demand across the nation.
  • Mon, 09/16/2019

    Disease-Resistant Weed Shows Promise in Effort to Re-domesticate Quinoa in New England

    Researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have discovered a native relative of quinoa with high disease resistance that may be an ideal breeding partner to re-domesticate the superfood in Northern New England. A locally adapted source of quinoa would give the region’s farmers new high-value grain crop that is in high demand across the nation.
  • Mon, 09/16/2019

    Morning Ag Clips: UNH hosts 'Under the Vines' Field Day Oct. 2

    Those interested in the commercial production of seedless table grapes and kiwiberries are invited to the 4th annual “Under the Vines” Field Day from 4 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019. The event will be held at the University of New Hampshire Woodman Horticultural Research Farm, a facility of the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station. It is free and open to the public.
  • Mon, 09/16/2019

    Concord Monitor: Trying to bring quinoa to N.H.

    Researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have discovered a native relative of quinoa with high disease resistance that may be an ideal breeding partner to re-domesticate the grain in Northern New England. A locally adapted source of quinoa would give the region’s farmers new high-value grain crop that is in high demand across the nation.
  • UNH’s seedless table grape research is intended to benefit regional growers interested in growing table grapes for local markets. Credit: Scott Ripley/UNH
    Mon, 09/09/2019

    UNH Hosts ‘Under the Vines’ Field Day Oct. 2

    Those interested in the commercial production of seedless table grapes and kiwiberries are invited to the 4th annual “Under the Vines” Field Day from 4 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019. The event will be held at the University of New Hampshire Woodman Horticultural Research Farm, a facility of the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station. It is free and open to the public.
  • Sun, 09/08/2019

    Seacoast Online: UNH researchers study 2017 hurricane to understand impact on New England

    Large, extreme events such as hurricanes and superstorms are becoming more frequent under a changing climate. Researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire are looking to new findings from Hurricane Maria, a Category 5 hurricane that hit Puerto Rico in September 2017 to understand how large storms may affect New England watersheds, streams and river networks.
  • Tue, 09/03/2019

    UNH Researchers Study Puerto Rico Hurricane to Understand Impact of New England Storms on Watersheds

    Large, extreme events such as hurricanes and superstorms are becoming more frequent under a changing climate. Researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire are looking to new findings from a major hurricane in Puerto Rico to understand how large storms may affect New England watersheds, streams, and river networks.
  • Tue, 08/27/2019

    HortiDaily: US (NH): Extending strawberry season with low tunnels

    Researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have succeeded in quadrupling the length of the Granite State’s strawberry growing season as part of a multi-year, multi-state research project that aims to benefit both growers and consumers. Learn more about this research project in the video produced in collaboration with USDA Northeast Climate Hub.
  • Mon, 08/26/2019

    HortiDaily: US: Investigating new specialty crops for New Hampshire

    New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station researcher Dr. Becky Sideman is a professor of plant biology and extension professor and specialist in sustainable horticulture production. She investigates new specialty crops and crop production methods for producers in New Hampshire. Learn more about her research and how she is training the next generation of crop scientists.
  • Mon, 08/26/2019

    Investigating New Specialty Crops for New Hampshire

    NH Agricultural Experiment Station researcher Dr. Becky Sideman is a professor of plant biology and extension professor and specialist in sustainable horticulture production. She investigates new specialty crops and crop production methods for producers in New Hampshire. Learn more about her research and how she is training the next generation of crop scientists. 
  • Wed, 08/21/2019

    Union Leader: NH oyster farmers ramping up harvesting

    Commercial oyster farming in New Hampshire has been growing on the Seacoast as smaller operations ramp up to the scale of full production. New Hampshire’s 32 commercial mollusk operations already pull in an estimated $419,000 in sales annually. A bulk of that money comes from oyster farms, according to a research professor of biological sciences at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Tue, 08/20/2019

    Associated Press: Researcher: Oyster farming has room to grow in New Hampshire

    A University of New Hampshire researcher says oyster production in the state is only a small fraction of what it could be. Ray Grizzle, research professor of biological sciences, says the total number of farms is probably nearing the maximum for the Little Bay area, but production isn’t yet.
  • Working with existing and prospective farms as well as regulatory agencies, New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station researcher Ray Grizzle began conducting research to expand the state’s oyster farming industry about 10 years ago. According to new data released by the USDA in the 2017 Census of Agriculture, New Hampshire has 32 commercial mollusk operations representing $419,000 in sales.
    Mon, 08/19/2019

    NH Commercial Oyster Farming Industry Gains Ground, Has Substantial Growth Potential

    New Hampshire’s commercial oyster farming industry is strong and growing, with the substantial growth potential to increase production, according to a researcher with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Fri, 08/16/2019

    Seacoast Online: Visit UNH research farms on Durham Farm Day Aug. 17

    Growers and the public are invited to visit two research farms at the University of New Hampshire on the 7th annual Durham Farm Day Saturday, Aug. 17. The Woodman Horticultural Research Farm and the Fairchild Dairy Teaching and Research Center, both facilities of the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, will be open for free public tours.
  • Fri, 08/16/2019

    Concord Monitor: More water or more growth? Trees change their mind as CO2 grows

     Research from the University of New Hampshire finds that the increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted into the atmosphere by human activity and fossil fuels is altering the way forests grow and use water. Scientists found that trees in the United States respond to this rise in CO2 by using it to grow faster or by conserving water, depending on whether water is abundant or scarce. Their results differ from existing literature about how forests are helping to mitigate climate change.