News & Events

  • Tue, 10/27/2020

    Union Leader: UNH researchers say drought will affect future of red oaks, white pines

    This year’s drought could affect the future health of red oak and white pine trees in the state, according to a researcher at the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station.
  • Mon, 10/26/2020

    2020 Severe Drought Likely to Slow Tree Growth Next Year

    Red oak and white pine trees could experience slower growth next year as a result of the severe drought in New Hampshire and most of New England that began in mid-August, according to a researcher with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station in the UNH College of Life Sciences and Agriculture.
  • Mon, 10/19/2020

    UNH Researchers Receive $1.5M Grant to Study Carbon Interactions in Thawing Arctic

    Scientists with the University of New Hampshire College of Life Sciences and Agriculture will lead research as part of a $1.5 million award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to better understand how interactions between plants, microbes, and soil minerals in permafrost, a subsurface layer of frozen soil covering a fourth of the Northern Hemisphere, stimulate the release of carbon which adds to the warming Arctic.
  • Mon, 10/12/2020

    Morning Ag Clips: UNH scientists receive $2M grant to support organic dairy industry

    Researchers with University of New Hampshire College of Life Sciences and Agriculture have received a near $2 million grant to help organic dairies remain profitable in the face of ongoing dairy market changes. Led by scientists with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, the research will develop new science-based management techniques to boost productivity and economic efficiency and, in turn, support the continued supply of New England organic dairy products locally and regionally.
  • Wed, 10/07/2020

    UNH Scientists Receive $2M Grant to Support Organic Dairy Industry

    Researchers with University of New Hampshire College of Life Sciences and Agriculture have received a near $2 million grant to help organic dairies remain profitable in the face of ongoing dairy market changes. Led by scientists with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, the research will develop new science-based management techniques to boost productivity and economic efficiency and, in turn, support the continued supply of New England organic dairy products locally and regionally.
  • Mon, 09/28/2020

    The Importance of Estuaries

    Last week, the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station celebrated National Estuaries Week. A number of our researchers conduct research on the Great Bay Estuary. Learn more below about their important research and how it is serving the state of New Hampshire.
  • Mon, 09/21/2020

    Listeria Found in Wild Gray Foxes in New Hampshire

    Listeria has been found in two New Hampshire wild gray foxes by investigators at the New Hampshire Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at the University of New Hampshire. A zoonotic disease, the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes can sicken both people and farm animals. Some strains can be particularly important if they are resistant to multiple antibiotics and carry genes that lead to more severe diseases in infected people or animals
  • Wed, 09/16/2020

    Morning Ag Clips: Learn how to grow melons in your garden

    Vine-ripened cantaloupe are delicious, yet few New Hampshire gardeners grow them. Come learn virtually about proven tips and solutions for growing great melons including how to select and prepare a growing site, varieties adapted to our area, when to start and transplant, how to accelerate the growth of your melons, how to manage pests and diseases, how to fertilize, and when to harvest.
  • Mon, 09/14/2020

    Learn How to Grow Melons in Your Garden

    Vine-ripened cantaloupe are delicious, yet few New Hampshire gardeners grow them. Come learn virtually about proven tips and solutions for growing great melons including how to select and prepare a growing site, varieties adapted to our area, when to start and transplant, how to accelerate the growth of your melons, how to manage pests and diseases, how to fertilize, and when to harvest.
  • Tue, 09/08/2020

    Union Leader: UNH: Treetop drone image research benefits forest industry

    University of New Hampshire researchers are working on developing better methods for segmenting aerial forest images taken by drones to pinpoint different tree species for more effective forest management.
  • Mon, 08/31/2020

    UNH Researcher to Develop New Gene Editing Tools

    A researcher at the University of New Hampshire has received a USDA grant to develop new gene editing tools that could help scientists unravel how certain bacteria—which were previously understudied—promote growth in plants and protect them from environment stress. The tools are a critical step in better understanding the dynamics of bacteria-plant interactions that benefit plants and crops, and could advance global efforts to clean contaminated soils, reduce pollution, and tolerate salt in soil.
  • Wed, 08/26/2020

    Concord Monitor: UNH: Shrimp byproduct could boost bio-pesticides

    University of New Hampshire researchers have teamed up with colleagues from Pennsylvania State University to investigate whether a byproduct of shrimp shells from the seafood industry could help manage one of the most devastating fruit diseases facing the U.S. apple industry. 
  • Mon, 08/24/2020

    UNH CREAMers During COVID-19

    During COVID, several students in UNH CREAM stayed behind to live at our UNH Fairchild Dairy Teaching and Research Center to study remotely, care for our research herd, and care for each other during the pandemic. They are amazing.
  • Thu, 08/20/2020

    Morning Ag Clips: Learn how to grow this tropical-tasting fruit in your garden

    New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station researcher Iago Hale, associate professor of specialty crop improvement at UNH, and Will Hastings, manager of UNH’s Kiwiberry Vineyard, will join Ask UNH Extension host Nate Bernitz for “Growing Kiwiberries in New Hampshire Gardens.” Attendees can expect to learn about selecting kiwiberry plants; tips for care throughout the seasons; how to plant and maintain kiwiberry vines; how to train and prune kiwiberries; and strategies for maintaining healthy, productive plants. To watch and participate, visit the Ask UNH ExtensionFacebook page (@AskUNHExtension) or UNH Extension Facebook page (@UNHExtension) Thursday, Aug. 27 at 6 p.m. Scroll down to the video, click on it to activate the audio, and join the conversation.
  • Mon, 08/17/2020

    UNH’s Kiwiberry Experts to Discuss How to Grow Tropical-Tasting Fruit in N.H. Gardens

    Kiwiberries are tropical-tasting fruits that have grown in the backyards and private gardens of the region for more than 140 years. Granite Staters interested in adopting this long gardening tradition are invited to learn more from UNH’s Kiwiberry Research and Breeding Program experts.
  • Tue, 08/11/2020

    Growing Produce: Shrimp Shells Loom Large in Fight Against Apple Scab

    Researchers from the University of New Hampshire and Penn State University are investigating the effectiveness of chitosan — a byproduct of mostly shrimp shells from the seafood industry — in the management of apple scab for Northeast farmers.
  • Tue, 08/11/2020

    UNH Mourns Passing of Long-Time Researcher Dr. J. Brent Loy

    The University of New Hampshire community is mourning the passing of Dr. J. Brent Loy, University of New Hampshire professor emeritus and long-time NH Agricultural Experiment Station researcher. Loy, 79, died Friday, July 24, 2020, after being diagnosed four months ago with a rare sarcoma cancer.
  • Mon, 08/10/2020

    UNH Research Aims to Manage Apple Scab Using Seafood Industry Byproduct

    University of New Hampshire researchers have teamed up with colleagues from Pennsylvania State University to investigate whether a byproduct of the seafood industry could help manage one of the most devastating fruit diseases facing the U.S. apple industry.
  • Tue, 07/28/2020

    Concord Monitor: UNH says drones & multispectral pictures *can* see the forest for the trees

    In a new study, University of New Hampshire researchers have concluded that when assessing forest imagery collected by unmanned aerial systems, an alternative method of delineating individual forest tree crowns within those images is more accurate than the most commonly used method, the canopy height model.
  • Mon, 07/27/2020

    UNH Researchers Identify More Effective Method to Delineate Tree Crowns Using Unmanned Aerial Imagery

    In a new study, University of New Hampshire researchers have concluded that when assessing forest imagery collected by unmanned aerial systems, an alternative method of delineating individual forest tree crowns within those images is more accurate than the most commonly used method, the canopy height model. The research is important to New Hampshire landowners and forest managers as mapping and monitoring forests is a key component of managing natural resources.
  • Wed, 07/22/2020

    Union Leader: Greenhouse growers could benefit from UNH research

    “Wood fiber materials have been used in Europe since the 1980s, and they are gaining market share among North American floriculture operations," Crysta Harris said in a news release of her research as a UNH graduate student. "Researchers have found that wood fiber can enhance certain peat mixes due to its unique properties."
  • Mon, 07/20/2020

    Pine Wood Fiber Shows Promise as an Alternative Growing Material

    Increasing transportation costs, concerns over the environmental sustainability of peat harvesting processes, and occasional shortages of peat and perlite have increased the need for alternative growing materials, which are called substrates, for ornamental plant growers. New research from the University of New Hampshire shows amending traditional soilless substrates with pine wood fiber has great potential as an alternative material for the state’s floriculture industry.
  • Thu, 07/16/2020

    Union Leader: Family and employment drive people to move to New Hampshire

    People who moved to New Hampshire in the past decade most often cited family and employment reasons, while longer-term residents pointed to family and the natural environment as factors for staying here. Multiple forces influenced people who settled here within the past decade, according to a new University of New Hampshire research paper.