News & Events

  • Mon, 02/24/2020

    Fungi Feud: State-of-the-Science Paper Resolves Mycorrhizae Controversy

    Serita Frey, UNH professor of natural resources and the environment and researcher with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, recently authored a state-of-the-science article, Mycorrhizal Fungi as Mediators of Soil Organic Matter Dynamics, that addresses a controversy among scientists about whether or not mycorrhizal fungi contribute to the soil carbon cycle. (Spoiler alert: They do.)
  • Fri, 02/21/2020

    2020 UNH Greenhouse Open House Cancelled Due to Ongoing Construction

    The 2020 UNH Greenhouse Open House at the Macfarlane Research Greenhouse formerly scheduled for Saturday, March 28, has been cancelled. The greenhouse is undergoing expansion and renovation that will advance the university’s teaching, research, and outreach capabilities in the areas of agriculture, horticulture, and plant science.
  • Tue, 02/18/2020

    Morning Ag Clips: Of mice and mushrooms

    The research was conducted by Ryan Stephens, a postdoctoral researcher, and Rebecca Rowe, associate professor of natural resources and the environment. Scientists spent three years collecting and analyzing more than 1,200 scat samples collected from small mammals at the Bartlett Experimental Station in the White Mountain National Forest to determine the types and amounts of spores they are dispersing. 
  • Tue, 02/18/2020

    Fosters: Mice and Mushrooms: Non-Picky Eaters More Effective at Spreading Spores than Previously Thought

    Small mammals such as mice and chipmunks who are not picky eaters play a more important role than previously known in dispersing the spores of wild mushrooms and truffles, according to new research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Tue, 02/18/2020

    Concord Monitor: Love mushrooms? Thank non-picky rodents

    Mushrooms and truffles are key components to forests where they colonize the roots of plants and assist with water and nutrient uptake. They also play a fundamental role in helping reestablish plants following disturbances such as wildfires, volcanic eruptions, and the retreat of melting glaciers. 
  • Mon, 02/17/2020

    Mice and Mushrooms: Non-Picky Eaters More Effective at Spreading Spores than Previously Thought

    Small mammals such as mice and chipmunks who are not picky eaters play a more important role than previously known in dispersing the spores of wild mushrooms and truffles, according to new research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Wed, 02/12/2020

    Washington Post: What you’re probably getting wrong about New Hampshire primary voters

    NH's population is newer than you think. Only about 35 percent of the state’s voting-age residents were born there — easily the lowest rate in the Northeast, Census Bureau figures from 2018 show. Only a handful of migration magnets — such as Nevada, Florida and Arizona — rank higher.
  • Tue, 02/11/2020

    Morning Ag Clips: Brewery residues show promise as dairy cow feed

    Wet brewers grains, the abundant residues of the brewery industry, show promise as a potential cost-effective, high-nutrient feed replacement for dairy heifers, according to new research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Mon, 02/10/2020

    Residues from Brewery Industry Show Promise as Dairy Heifer Feed

    Wet brewers grains, the abundant residues of the brewery industry, show promise as a potential cost-effective, high-nutrient feed replacement for dairy heifers, according to new research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire.
  • André Brito
    Mon, 02/03/2020

    Big Move Leads to UNH

    Meet André Brito, researcher with the NH Agricultural Experiment Station and associate professor of agriculture, nutrition, and food systems. 
  • Mon, 02/03/2020

    NBC Boston: UNH Expert to Give Talk on Growing Kiwiberries, a Small Cousin of the Kiwi

    Will Hastings, vineyard manager and research technician of the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station's program, will give a discussion on Saturday at the NOFA-NH Winter Conference at Kearsarge Regional High School in North Sutton.
  • Tue, 01/28/2020

    Morning Ag Clips: Learn how to grow kiwiberries this winter

    With their general adaptation to the region, their attractive appearance, intense and complex flavor profiles, high levels of bioactive compounds, and easy consumability, kiwiberries (Actinidia arguta) have long been recognized for their potential as a high-value crop in New England. A tender, smooth-skinned relative of the fuzzy supermarket kiwi, grape-sized kiwiberries are tropical-tasting fruits that have grown in the backyards and private gardens of the region for more than 140 years. Despite this long history in the region, however, virtually no commercial production exists.
  • Mon, 01/27/2020

    Learn to Grow Kiwiberries in New England

    Come learn about the commercial production of kiwiberries in New England from Will Hastings, vineyard manager and research technician for the NH Agricultural Experiment Station’s Kiwiberry Breeding and Research Development program. Based at the University of New Hampshire, the program is the first of its kind in the nation and has established itself as a global leader in the genetic improvement of the crop.
  • Thu, 01/23/2020

    WMUR: Dog in NH diagnosed with fungal disease common in Southwest

    "It's really important to talk to your vet about the history of if your pet traveled to the area, even just for vacation, or if you adopted it from that area," Monahan said.
  • Photomicrograph from the biopsied mass showing a fungal spherule (arrow), consistent with Coccidioides, surrounded by inflammatory cells. Credit: NH Veterinary Diagnostic Lab
    Tue, 01/21/2020

    UNH Pathologist Diagnoses Valley Fever in Rescue Dog from Arizona

    A pathologist with New Hampshire Diagnostic Veterinary Lab at the University of New Hampshire recently diagnosed the fungal disease Valley Fever in a rescue dog from Arizona. It is the first time the lab has diagnosed this disease in a dog in the state. The disease, which is treatable, is endemic in the Southwest and rarely seen in native New England dogs.
  • Tue, 01/21/2020

    Concord Monitor: When pets travel, pet diseases also travel

    A pathologist with the New Hampshire Diagnostic Veterinary Lab at the University of New Hampshire recently diagnosed the fungal disease Valley Fever in a rescue dog from Arizona. It is the first time the lab has diagnosed this disease in a dog in the state. The disease, which is treatable, is endemic in the Southwest and rarely seen in native New England dogs.
  • Fri, 01/17/2020

    Fruit Growers News: NH Agricultural Experiment Station shares updates at 2020 NH Farm and Forest Expo

    Are rivers the livers of watersheds? Should farmers plant cider apples to thwart pests in orchards? Come find out from scientists with the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire, who will present their latest research at the 2020 New Hampshire Farm, Forest, and Garden Expo.
  • Tue, 01/14/2020

    NHPR: New England Will See More ‘Winter Heat Waves’ As Climate Warms, Scientists Say

    Scientists say winter warm spells – like the one the Northeast saw this past weekend – are in line with predictions for climate change.
  • Oyster River
    Mon, 01/13/2020

    Are Rivers the Livers of Watersheds? Should Farmers Plant Cider Apples to Thwart Pests?

    Are rivers the livers of watersheds? Should farmers plant cider apples to thwart pests in orchards? Come find out from scientists with the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire, who will present their latest research at the 2020 New Hampshire Farm, Forest, and Garden Expo.
  • Fri, 01/10/2020

    Seacoast Online: UNH research: Cows fed kelp meal are less gassy, and that’s good for the planet

    Experiment station researchers will collaborate with New England scientists on a new $3 million grant from the Shelby Cullom Davis Charitable Fund to investigate reducing methane emissions of lactating dairy cows by supplementing their diet with kelp meal (brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum) and other seaweeds. 
  • Thu, 01/09/2020

    Fosters: UNH research: Cows fed kelp meal are less gassy, and that’s good for the planet

    Organic dairy cows fed kelp meal produced less methane for part of the summer grazing season, according to researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire. Based on these initial and other promising results, scientists will expand their studies to look at how kelp and other seaweeds impact animal health and methane emissions of organic dairy cows in New England.
  • Wed, 01/08/2020

    Morning Ag Clips: Seaweed research to benefit region’s dairy farmers

     Organic dairy cows fed kelp meal produced less methane for part of the summer grazing season, according to researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire. Based on these initial and other promising results, scientists will expand their studies to look at how kelp and other seaweeds impact animal health and methane emissions of organic dairy cows in New England.
  • Wed, 01/08/2020

    Union Leader Editorial: Cows for kelp? UNH Ag folks to test seaweed diet

    UNH has a long, productive history with agriculture and continues to work with farmers and gardeners, among others, in its agriculture extension programs. The seaweed project sounds promising. If it pays off, farmers may not feel so much pressure to make hay while the sun shines.
  • Tue, 01/07/2020

    Union Leader: Seaweed diet may make cows less greenhouse gassy

    “Incorporating changes in feed composition has downstream consequences for pasture performance,” Brito said in the news release. “This includes not only grass nutritional quality and growth rates but also the rates of loss of carbon and nitrogen resources to the atmosphere in the form of greenhouse gases.”
  • Mon, 01/06/2020

    UNH Scientists Expand Seaweed Research to Benefit Region’s Dairy Farmers

    Organic dairy cows fed kelp meal produced less methane for part of the summer grazing season, according to researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire. Based on these initial and other promising results, scientists will expand their studies to look at how kelp and other seaweeds impact animal health and methane emissions of organic dairy cows in New England.