News & Events

  • Mon, 01/06/2020

    Concord Monitor: To reduce cow burps’ nastiness, just add seaweed

     Organic dairy cows fed kelp meal produced less methane for part of the summer grazing season, according to researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire. Based on these initial and other promising results, scientists will expand their studies to look at how kelp and other seaweeds impact animal health and methane emissions of organic dairy cows in New England.
  • Mon, 12/30/2019

    NH Agricultural Experiment Station 2019 Research in Review

    Our researchers and graduate students are working on more than 50 research projects to serve the Granite State. Here are a few highlights from 2019. 
  • Mon, 12/30/2019

    Washington Post: Slippery salvation: Could seaweed as cow feed help climate?

    The researchers — from a marine science lab, an agriculture center and universities in northern New England — are working on a plan to feed seaweed to cows to gauge whether that can help reduce the greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change.
  • Mon, 12/23/2019

    Happy Holidays

    In December 2018, Ruby got her hoof caught in a grate, pulled it off, and slipped into a manure trench at our Fairchild Dairy Teaching and Research Center. Durham Fire and McGregor EMS crews worked for three hours to rescue the 1,200 Holstein, who was not pregnant at the time, from her “stinky situation.” The grate since has been modified. This December, first responders reunited with Ruby and met her one-week-old calf, named McGregor by University of New Hampshire College of Life Sciences and Agriculture students to recognize their effort in saving Ruby’s life. We hope your holiday season is just as memorable as Ruby’s was last year, but for less dramatic (and smelly) reasons.
  • Fri, 12/20/2019

    Concord Monitor: Is genetic history lurking in old apple trees hiding on your property?

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture has an entire program based in New York to research and teach “plant and animal genetic resources preservation,” and you’ve probably heard of Svalbard Global Seed Vault on the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen, which collects material from seed banks around the world to preserve it in case of major calamity.  All this is being done partly for aesthetic and environmental reasons – diversity is good – but mostly for practical reasons, said Richard Smith, whose job title at UNH is awesome: associate professor of cropping systems ecology and management. 
  • Mon, 12/16/2019

    A Connection to the Land

    I grew up on a farm that was in my family for six or seven generations. My mom still runs it with my sister. Both my parents farmed; I’ve been exposed to plants and animals since I was tiny. Several pictures of me as a little kid show me hugging mums.
  • Thu, 12/12/2019

    Union Leader: UNH scientist one of 'the world's most influential researchers'

    “Don’t give up. Be persistent, work hard and follow your passion. Don’t let anyone tell you you can’t do it. Seek out scientists and see if you can work with them. I’ve had elementary, middle and high school students contact me about doing research projects. It’s never too early to start,” Frey said.
  • Wed, 12/11/2019

    Fosters: UNH ecologist a top 0.1 percent scientist: Here’s why

    Serita Frey, professor of soil microbial ecology at the University of New Hampshire and a researcher with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, has been named one of the most highly cited researchers in the world, a prestigious distinction earned by fewer than 0.1 percent of scientists globally.
  • Wed, 12/11/2019

    Union Leader: Reunion for UNH's Ruby the cow and the firefighters who saved her

    Emergency rescue workers who helped to save the life of a cow that got stuck in a manure trench at the University of New Hampshire last year had a reunion with her and her newborn calf on Wednesday morning.
  • Tue, 12/10/2019

    Concord Monitor: Science Cafe panelist (oh, yes, also a UNH scientist) wins big recognition

    Serita Frey, professor of soil microbial ecology at the University of New Hampshire and a researcher with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, has been named one of the most highly cited researchers in the world, a distinction earned by fewer than 0.1 percent of scientists globally. If that name sounds familiar, Concord, it’s because she was one of the panelists at our Science Cafe New Hampshire last June, which talked about the weird, hidden world of microbes and trees.
  • Mon, 12/09/2019

    UNH Ecologist Named One of Most Highly Cited Researchers in World

    Serita Frey, professor of soil microbial ecology at the University of New Hampshire and a researcher with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, has been named one of the most highly cited researchers in the world, a prestigious distinction earned by fewer than 0.1 percent of scientists globally.
  • Tue, 12/03/2019

    Wired: Melting ski resorts are developing a fatal addiction to snow machines

    With thousands of snowmaking devices dotted around the world’s ski resorts gobbling energy, some have questioned how much they are themselves contributing to the very climatic changes that have altered natural snowfall. NH Agricultural Experiment Station researcher Elizabeth Burakowski says snowmaking operations that don’t rely on renewable energy risk becoming part of the problem.
  • Wed, 11/27/2019

    Union Leader: UNH dairy researchers studying calves and heifers to improve farming in state

    Research being conducted on calves and heifers at the University of New Hampshire is geared at helping dairy farmers in the state.
  • Tue, 11/26/2019

    Morning Ag Clips: Research boosts New England's Thanksgiving bounty

    As New Englanders prepare to gather with family and friends this week, their Thanksgiving table may be filled with an abundant supply of delicious, locally and regionally grown foods due to extensive agricultural research conducted by the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Mon, 11/25/2019

    UNH Agricultural Research Boosts New England’s Thanksgiving Bounty

    As New Englanders prepare to gather with family and friends this week, their Thanksgiving table may be filled with an abundant supply of delicious, locally and regionally grown foods due to extensive agricultural research conducted by the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire.
  • N.H. Population Change from 2000 to 2018.
    Tue, 11/19/2019

    Migration is Biggest Driver of Population Change in New Hampshire

    The Granite State continues to depend on migration for most of its population growth, and the state is becoming more racially diverse, according to new research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station and the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Tue, 11/19/2019

    Concord Monitor: Report details shifts in state’s population

    The Granite State continues to depend on migration for most of its population growth, and the state is becoming more racially diverse, according to new research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station and the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Mon, 11/18/2019

    Fosters: Is pay-as-you-throw trash worth cost? Durham to decide

    Pay as you throw is not a particularly new concept. Roughly three dozen New Hampshire cities and towns use this model, including Dover, Somersworth and Raymond. Research from the University of New Hampshire shows these programs boost recycling and reduce trash volumes. “Households respond to economic incentives,” said John Halstead, UNH professor of natural resources and the environment, said in a news release issued last year. “With unit-based pricing, the cost to the household may increase to dispose of trash, but the incentive to recycle is greater.”
  • Thu, 11/14/2019

    Union Leader: UNH research: Warmer winters benefit grasslands more than forests

    "While we might think a longer growing season means that forests can take up more carbon, this can be offset if warm winters cause soils to thaw and lose carbon long before tree growth begins.”  
  • Wed, 11/13/2019

    Concord Monitor: Grasslands beat forests in taking advantage of warming winters

    As the climate changes, Northeast winters are warming more rapidly than other times of the year. While this may mean favorable growing conditions start earlier in the year, some ecosystems, such as perennial grasslands, can take better advantage of that change than others, such as forests, according to new research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Forest understory with melting snoFog over melting snowpack in forest understory at Thompson Farm forest. Credit: Rebecca Sanders-DeMott/UNHw at Thompson Farm forest. Credit: Rebecca Sanders-DeMott/UNH
    Tue, 11/12/2019

    Grasslands Better than Forests at Taking Advantage of Northeast’s Warming Winters

    As climate changes, Northeast winters are warming more rapidly than other times of the year. While this may mean favorable growing conditions start earlier in the year, some ecosystems, such as perennial grasslands, can take better advantage of that change than others, such as forests, according to new research from the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire.
  • Wed, 11/06/2019

    Union Leader: UNH researchers take to trees to study nitrogen, carbon levels

    Researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have received a National Science Foundation Award to better understand how forests and other vegetation affect nitrogen and carbon in the environment.
  • Mon, 11/04/2019

    UNH Researchers Investigate How Diverse Forests, Watersheds Control Nitrogen and Carbon

    Researchers with the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have received a National Science Foundation Award to better understand how forests and other vegetation control nitrogen and sequester carbon in watersheds and how this dynamic varies in different types of landscapes as well as under climate variability. Nitrogen is a nutrient that is both critical for life but, in excess, causes coastal algal blooms. Carbon storage helps offset greenhouse gases.
  • Fri, 11/01/2019

    Seed World: For Jack o’ Lanterns, White is the New Orange

    Brent Loy’s experiment station-funded work, which has largely taken place at the experiment station’s Kingman Research Farm, Woodman Horticultural Research Farm and Macfarlane Research Greenhouses, has resulted in more than 80 new varieties of cucurbits  — squash, pumpkins, gourds, and melons — sold in seed catalogs throughout the world. Along with cucurbit breeding introduced by the late A.F. Yeager in 1940, this breeding research represents the longest continuous squash and pumpkin breeding program in North America.
  • Wed, 10/30/2019

    Water: Nutrient Sensor Action Challenge Winners: Data And Decisions To Manage Excess Nutrients

    In Durham, New Hampshire, a research team at the University of New Hampshire deployed low-cost nutrient sensors to assess amount and timing of nitrate fluxes through reservoirs.